History

Dennis Banks FBI File

Dennis Banks passed away on October 29, 2017. On November 1, 2017 I filed a Freedom of Information Act request with the FBI for any files related to Banks. Most of the FBI files related to the American Indian Movement have been public for a number of years but I was curious to see if the FBI would release anything new Banks following his death.

From the Archives: The Vanishing Americans

Here’s a little article I pulled from a digital copy of The Indian, May 28, 1970: What really drew my attention to the article was the blending of traditional identity with contemporary rock music, then I decided to see if they ever managed to get that record made.

Bob Englehart's Golden Hill Paugussett Cartoon

In her book, Cash, Color, and Colonialism: The Politics of Tribal Acknowledgement, Renee Cramer made a passing reference to a cartoon in the Hartford Courant on the controversy over the potential federal acknowledgement of the Golden Hill Paugussetts in Connecticut.

The West, The Wild West, and California

Monday’s freshman American history survey ended with the students having to write about what the defined as the west and what would fall into the “wild west.” Most of the students tended to favor a geographic approach to the west with the general concensus being anything from roughly Oklahoma to the Pacific was “the west.

Always Take First Hand Accounts With a Grain of Salt

One of the many books I picked up today at the library was We Are Still Here: A Photographic History of The American Indian Movement, a good looking large glossy text produced by the Minnesota Historical Society Press which included photographs by Dick Bancroft and text by Laura Waterman Wittstock.

Beer Archive

Archive I have no use for but wish I did: Just nine months into the job, Edmunson-Morton has already collected a variety of materials for the archives, including craft beer singleers, hops breeding reports and historic photographs.

Murray Hall Name Debate

In the 1930s Oklahoma A&M president Henry G. Bennett wanted some new buildings from the alphabet soup of New Deal public works programs. He managed to secure Murray Hall, what use to be a female dorm and now the home to multiple academic departments (including history).

Tulsa in 1918

The hand-drawn map (not done to scale) comes from the Library of Congress’s maps collections. The full version can be downloaded or viewed here. Here’s some other historical maps from Oklahoma.

The Ghosts of Louisiana's Johnson & Gosset Plantation

Sometime around 1859 or 1860 two cousins from Kentucky tore down “the handsomest and most commodious mansion on the Mississippi,” seemingly within months of having bought it. The two and a half story mansion, built in 1780 by a thirty-five year old former lieutenant in the French Navy, sat on over a thousand acres of land and featured three foot thick walls of water lime bricks.

At Least It's Only a Belief in Vampirism

George R. Stetson writing about the belief in Vampirism amongst the population in rural Rhode Island during the nineteenth century: …[I]t is perhaps fortunate that the isolation of which this is probably the product, an isolation common in sparsely settled regions, where thought stagnates and insanity and superstition are prevalent, has produced nothing worse.