Articles

This is What They Call a Metaphor

He was born in the summer of his 27th year Coming home to a place he’d never been before He left yesterday behind him, you might say he was born again

It ain't no sin to be glad you're alive

Hell’s brewin’ dark sun’s on the rise This storm’ll blow through by and by House is on fire, Viper’s in the grass A little revenge and this too shall pass

Publishing a Markdown CV to PDF and HTML

Huge caveat from the get go: I don’t know how useful any of this will be to anyone. For one, there are probably far more elegant ways of doing this whole affair and someone smarter than me has undoubtedly found it.

Where'd the Death Come From? Editing Wikipedia's Wounded Knee Entry

According to Alexa, the English language version of Wikipedia is the seventh ranked site on the Internet and the only vaguely academic site besides the omnipotent Google on the list. Yet even though Wikipedia and its five million articles have become a ubiquitous part of how we figure out the answer to life’s vexing questions, most people know little about how the content actually gets on Wikipedia.

Bob Englehart's Golden Hill Paugussett Cartoon

In her book, Cash, Color, and Colonialism: The Politics of Tribal Acknowledgement, Renee Cramer made a passing reference to a cartoon in the Hartford Courant on the controversy over the potential federal acknowledgement of the Golden Hill Paugussetts in Connecticut.

The West, The Wild West, and California

Monday’s freshman American history survey ended with the students having to write about what the defined as the west and what would fall into the “wild west.” Most of the students tended to favor a geographic approach to the west with the general concensus being anything from roughly Oklahoma to the Pacific was “the west.

Always Take First Hand Accounts With a Grain of Salt

One of the many books I picked up today at the library was We Are Still Here: A Photographic History of The American Indian Movement, a good looking large glossy text produced by the Minnesota Historical Society Press which included photographs by Dick Bancroft and text by Laura Waterman Wittstock.

Who's to Blame for Anna Mae Aquash's Death?

The New York Times Magazine published a piece of the death of Anna Mae Aquash, an AIM activist murdered in 1976, last month: On Feb. 24, 1976, a rancher in South Dakota was installing a fence on land situated along the edge of Pine Ridge Indian Reservation when he spotted a body at the bottom of a 30-foot embankment.

Murray Hall Name Debate

In the 1930s Oklahoma A&M president Henry G. Bennett wanted some new buildings from the alphabet soup of New Deal public works programs. He managed to secure Murray Hall, what use to be a female dorm and now the home to multiple academic departments (including history).

BIA Recognition Changes in Connecticut

I’ve been meaning to write an in-depth single about the Bureau of Indian Affairs attempt to change the process for tribes getting recognized and the backlash it’s received in Connecticut since it was announced last summer but simply haven’t had the time (or energy) to get around to it.